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With the built-in filter removed and replaced with a Baader UV-IR filter, the camera now has an optimized sensitivity to red, particularly, to H-alpha light. H-alpha light is perceived by the naked eye as deep red hue. It is important to astrophotographers because certain types of nebula emit light at this wavelength. Image taken with a modified Canon 450D and a Sky-Watcher 100ED refractor. To view highest resolution available, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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Here is my most recent prototype of a Peltier-cooled Canon 450D DSLR intended for astro-imaging. The intention was to incorporate improvement into each version. In this particular prototype, the camera is housed in a smaller plastic case, making it more compact, lighter, and more sturdy.

modified_canon_450D_aug_2014

Modified Canon 450D DSLR for astro-imaging (August 2014) mounted on a Sky-Watcher 100ED refractor

A custom-fabricated aluminum lens mount is used to allow the modified camera to accept standard Canon lenses and T-adapters. A Baader UV-IR filter is used to optimize sensitivity to H-alpha wavelengths, which also serves as the sealed chamber’s optical window. During operation, sensor temperature drops to 30 degrees C below ambient. To avoid dew from condensing on the optical window, coils of fine nichrome wire were used.

Dimensions: 16 cm x 12 cm x 7 cm case with 7.5 cm x 7 cm x 6 cm heat sink protruding on one side
Weight: approximately 1250 grams
Temperature: up to 30 deg C below ambient
Power supply: 12V 12A for the Peltier module, 8.4V 1.5A for the camera

Test shots and photos taken during construction will be posted soon. Clear skies!

For previous camera modification projects, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Observatory Visit, Capas Tarlac Science Teachers

Observatory visit with science teachers from Capas East District, Tarlac, on April 8, 2014. Stargazing activities and observatory visits are facilitated by the Earth Science Group of UP NISMED as part of the Institute’s extension program. For other stargazing activities and observatory visits, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. One such event will occur on October 8, 2014, visible from anywhere in the Philippines, from 6 to 8 pm (Philippine Time). The eclipse will also be visible in most parts of Asia, and North and South America.

October_8_2014_eclipse_visibility_map

Shaded areas indicate locations where the eclipse will be visible. Depending on the location, observers may see a partial eclipse or a total eclipse. (Reference: NASA GSFC/F.Espenak)

How to Observe and What to Expect

In the Philippines, a total lunar eclipse will be observed–the moon darkens and turns deep red-orange as it passes completely through the Earth’s shadow. Observing the eclipse requires no special equipment. The event may be observed from anywhere in the country provided that there is a clear view of the eastern horizon, and no clouds block the view of the moon. On October 8, 2014, simply face east from 6 to 8 pm and wait for the moon to rise. The best time to observe will be at around 6:55 pm, at eclipse maximum .

Lunar_Eclispe_Oct_8_2014

View of the eastern horizon at eclipse maximum (6:55 pm Philippine Time or 10:55 Universal Time) on October 8, 2014. Simulated image generated using Stellarium. (Click to enlarge.)

I intend to observe and photograph the eclipse with fellow astronomy enthusiasts, most likely from the vicinity of Quezon City. I will be setting up a telescope to achieve close-up views of the moon. Those who wish to join the observation may send a request to nightskyinfocus[at]gmail.com. Clear skies!

To subscribe to this site and learn about upcoming astronomical events, click here. For previous lunar eclipse observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Astro-Imaging in Bosoboso March 30, 2014

Imaging the night sky in Antipolo, Philippines, last March 29-30, 2014 with fellow astrophotography enthusiasts. I was able to visually observe some Messier objects near Sagittarius, along with the Milky Way, which is now well-placed in the southern horizon at around 3-4 am. I will be posting  images soon. For previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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