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Lunar eclipse as observed from Camarines Norte, Philippines on April 4, 2015. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For images of previous lunar eclipses, click here.

Lunar eclipse as observed from Camarines Norte, Philippines on April 4, 2015. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. The deep red hue of the moon is caused by sunlight refracted by the Earth’s atmosphere where most of the blue light has already been scattered, leaving only the red light to fall on to the moon’s surface.

Related links:
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on TV 5 (October 8, 2014)
Solar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 24, 2013)
Lunar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 23, 2013)
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on ABS-CBN (June 16, 2011)

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. One such event will occur on April 4, 2015, visible from anywhere in the Philippines, from around 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm (Philippine Time).

How to Observe and What to Expect

In the Philippines, a total lunar eclipse will be observed–the moon darkens and turns red-orange for a few minutes as it briefly passes completely through the Earth’s shadow. Observing the eclipse requires no special equipment. The event may be observed from anywhere in the country provided that there is a clear view of the eastern horizon, and no clouds block the view of the moon. On April 4, 2015, simply face east from 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm and look for the rising moon. The best time to observe will be at around 8 pm, at eclipse maximum.

Lunar Eclipse April 4, 2015

View of the eastern horizon at eclipse maximum (8 pm Philippine Time or 12:00 Universal Time) on April 4, 2015. Simulated image generated using Stellarium. (Click to enlarge.)

The eclipse will also be visible in most parts of Asia, North and South America, and Australia. For more information, click here.

Join Upcoming Observations

Join me and fellow astronomy enthusiasts in observing various astronomical events! It is free and is open to everyone! Take a look at our previous observations.

Astronomical observations are geared towards sharing astronomy with the general public. To keep you posted on upcoming events, click here .

For previous lunar eclipse observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Image of the eastern sky a few minutes before sunrise on March 1, 2015. Mercury is the bright object closest to the horizon on the lower right part of the image. Photo taken using a Canon 450D DSLR with 18-55 mm lens set at 18 mm, f/3.5, ISO 1600, 10 sec exposure, from Kiltepan Peak in Sagada, Mountain Province, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

Mercury is a relatively bright planet easily visible to the naked eye, but because of its close proximity to the Sun, it is often lost in the Sun’s glare. During sunrise and sunset, however, the region close to the Sun may be thoroughly searched without the blinding glare, making the task of finding the planet much easier. Mercury is the bright object closest to the horizon on the lower right part of the image. For more photos of planets, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Milky Way Kiltepan Sagada

Image of the Milky Way galaxy taken with a DSLR camera and a tripod. Canon 450D DSLR camera, 18-55 mm lens set at 18 mm, f/3.5, 30 sec exposure, ISO 1600, March 1, 2015 at Kiltepan Peak in Sagada, Mountain Province, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For other Milky Way photos, click here. To learn how to image the Milky Way using a point-and-shoot or a DSLR camera, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Stargazing Bagong Pag-asa Elementary School Feb 2015

Stargazing session with Bagong Pag-asa Elementary School, Quezon City, on February 23, 2015, as part of the UP Astronomical Society’s 2015 National Astronomy Week celebration. Students listened to lectures about the Constellations and the Solar System, and viewed the moon and some planets (such as Jupiter, Venus, and Mars) through powerful telescopes. More than 200 grade school students along with their parents and teachers attended the event. For previous observations, click here.

Astronomical observations are geared towards sharing astronomy with the general public. It is free and is open to everyone! Take a look at our previous observations. You may join scheduled observations, or you may even request one for your school! Send me a note at nightskyinfocus<at>gmail<dot>com.

To keep you posted on upcoming events, click here .

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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