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Venus_Jupiter_pairing_July1,2015

Click on the photo to view full resolution. Through a telescope, the crescent shape of Venus (left) and the cloud bands of Jupiter (right) become visible, as well as the moons that orbit around Jupiter. Image taken from Quezon City, Philippines, using a Canon 450D DSLR mounted on a 4-in f/9 refractor, ISO 1600, 1/200 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of close pairing of celestial objects, click here.

To the naked eye, Venus and Jupiter look very similar to stars. Through a telescope, however, the crescent shape of Venus and the cloud bands of Jupiter are revealed, as well as the moons that orbit Jupiter.

Close pairing occurs whenever two or more celestial objects (which could be a planet, a star, or the moon) appear to be in the same direction in the sky as viewed from Earth. While they would seem to be very close to each other (as in the case Venus and Jupiter), in reality, they are separated by vast distances.

To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.
For more images of close pairing of celestial objects, click here.

Related link: How to see Jupiter and Venus this July

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Jupiter_Venus_close_pairing_June26,2015

Starting today until the second week of July 2015, Venus and Jupiter can be seen like bright stars above the western horizon. No special equipment is needed to see the two planets. The photo above was taken at around 6:30 pm on June 26, 2015, from Rizal, Philippines. You, too, can see them for yourself. Read the instructions below on how to find Venus and Jupiter.

On the first and second week of July 2015, face west at around 6 to 7 pm and you will notice two bright ‘stars’ above the horizon. Those ‘stars’ are not actual stars, but rather, the planets Jupiter and Venus. You will see the two planets as a pair of lights in the sky (the brighter one is Venus and the dimmer one is Jupiter), very similar to what is shown in the photo above. You may observe the pairing of the two planets every day, but make sure to look at them on July 1, when the ‘gap’ between the two planets is smallest.

On July 18, the moon will join Venus and Jupiter to form one of the most interesting sights you can see in the sky: a ‘celestial triangle’. A recent ‘celestial triangle’ was seen on August 24, 2014. Your chance to see the next one will be on July 18, 2015. Simply face west at around 6 to 7 pm and see the moon, Venus, and Jupiter form a triangle as shown in the simulated image below.

Venus-Moon-Jupiter_July 18,2015

Venus, Jupiter, and the Moon form a triangle on July 18, 2015.

No special equipment is needed to see these events. Also, they can be viewed from anywhere in the Philippines. If you were able to witness the event or take a photograph of it, tell us about your experience by leaving a comment below. Clear skies!

To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here. Take a look at other similar, previously-observed planetary pairing and grouping here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Stargazing_BigHandysGrounds2015

Our tent and telescope, with the Milky Way at the background! Captured on June 27, 2015 at Big Handy’s Grounds, Tanay, Rizal, using a Canon 450D DSLR, 18-55 mm kit lens set at 18 mm, ISO 1600, f/3.5 at 30 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

Located just 50 km east of Manila, Big Handy’s Grounds offers skies dark enough for serious stargazing sessions. The photo above shows our tent and telescope, with the Milky Way at the background, captured on June 27, 2015 using a typical DSLR camera and a kit lens.

To learn how to take photos of the Milky Way, click here. For previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

anthony_urbano_april4_2015_ph

Lunar eclipse as observed from Camarines Norte, Philippines on April 4, 2015. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For images of previous lunar eclipses, click here.

Lunar eclipse as observed from Camarines Norte, Philippines on April 4, 2015. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. The deep red hue of the moon is caused by sunlight refracted by the Earth’s atmosphere where most of the blue light has already been scattered, leaving only the red light to fall on to the moon’s surface.

Related links:
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on TV 5 (October 8, 2014)
Solar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 24, 2013)
Lunar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 23, 2013)
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on ABS-CBN (June 16, 2011)

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. One such event will occur on April 4, 2015, visible from anywhere in the Philippines, from around 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm (Philippine Time).

How to Observe and What to Expect

In the Philippines, a total lunar eclipse will be observed–the moon darkens and turns red-orange for a few minutes as it briefly passes completely through the Earth’s shadow. Observing the eclipse requires no special equipment. The event may be observed from anywhere in the country provided that there is a clear view of the eastern horizon, and no clouds block the view of the moon. On April 4, 2015, simply face east from 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm and look for the rising moon. The best time to observe will be at around 8 pm, at eclipse maximum.

Lunar Eclipse April 4, 2015

View of the eastern horizon at eclipse maximum (8 pm Philippine Time or 12:00 Universal Time) on April 4, 2015. Simulated image generated using Stellarium. (Click to enlarge.)

The eclipse will also be visible in most parts of Asia, North and South America, and Australia. For more information, click here.

Join Upcoming Observations

Join me and fellow astronomy enthusiasts in observing various astronomical events! It is free and is open to everyone! Take a look at our previous observations.

Astronomical observations are geared towards sharing astronomy with the general public. To keep you posted on upcoming events, click here .

For previous lunar eclipse observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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