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Stellarium_UP_NISMED_Open_House

Students from various schools in Metro Manila explore a free planetarium software called Stellarium during the UP NISMED’s open house on August 13 to 14, 2014.

Stellarium, a free planetarium software, was showcased as part of the UP NISMED’s Open House on August 13 to 14, 2014, attended by 64 teachers and 454 students coming from various schools in Metro Manila. The interactive software is capable of displaying the local night sky and simulate the movement of constellations in the course of a night as well as its movement in the course of a year—a feature which educators, particularly Grade 9 teachers, may find useful in class. The topic ‘Constellations’ is discussed in Grade 9 K to 12, where students are expected to learn not only about star patterns, but also explain why certain constellations can be seen only at certain times of the year.

A free copy of the software may be downloaded here.

UP NISMED’s open house is part of a series of activities for NISMED’s 50th anniversary celebration on November 20, 2014.

Related links:
Android App for Navigating the Night Sky
Resources for Teaching Astronomy in the Philippine K to 12 Curriculum

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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Sunspot Groups September 7, 2014

 

Sunspot_September7,2014

Image of sunspot groups on September 7, 2014, taken with a Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor with a Baader Neutral Density (ND) 5.0 solar filter, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR,1/4000 sec exp, IS0 400. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of sunspots, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

phone to telescope adapter

DIY phone camera-to-telescope adapter built from scrap wood, rubber bands, screws, and a hose clamp.

Just finished building this cheap mobile phone camera-to-telescope adapter. It’s a very simple solution for those who usually take images of the moon and planets using a mobile phone camera and a telescope. The adapter allows any mobile phone camera to be mounted directly onto any telescope. It only takes an hour to build, requires simple tools, and costs just less than a dollar ($1)! This adapter will also work with other optical instrument such as binoculars and microscopes.

Being able to take astro images using only a phone camera and a telescope setup could inspire an astro-enthusiast to pursue astrophotography. If you feel you are now ready to try out a more complicated imaging setup (instead of using phones cameras, you’ll be imaging using digital cameras), try to building your own version of a Universal Camera Adapter :) This setup will most likely yield better photos and will enable you to take advantage of digital cameras’ zoom (optical) capability, which is useful for up-close shots of the moon craters and planets.

For other DIY projects useful for astrophotography, click here.

Related links (for advanced imagers):
DSLR for Astrophotography
Other Types of Camera-To-Telescope Adapters

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

As part of the Institute’s extension program, a total of 653 elementary and high school students were able to attend seven overnight stargazing activities conducted at UP NISMED from December 2013 to March 2014. These sessions were facilitated by members of the Earth Science Workgroup of UP NISMED along with some members of the UP Astronomical Society.

stargazing_at_upnismed_paranaque-sci-hs

Students from Parañaque Science High School look at Jupiter and its four of its brightest moons.

One of the highlights of the stargazing session is the viewing of night-sky objects through one of the country’s largest telescopes housed at the UP NISMED Observatory. Students as well as their teachers are treated with telescopic views of craters of the moon, Jupiter and four of its brightest moons, Saturn with its beautiful ring system, and a glimpse of the current phase of Venus. Participants also listen to various lectures aligned with the K to 12 Earth and Space Science topics such as constellations, the solar system, comets, and many others. Sessions are conducted at the rooftop of the NISMED building where participants spend the overnight session under the stars.
For further details and reservation, interested parties may contact UP NISMED at telephone no. (02) 928 3545.

This article was originally published by UP NISMED. For more info on stargazing activities and observatory visits, click here.

venus-jupiter-moon celestial grouping

Image of Venus-Jupiter-Moon celestial grouping on August 24, 2014, taken at 5 am from Camarines Norte, Philippines. Canon 450D, 50 mm lens, f/1.8, ISO 1600, 1/10 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of celestial grouping, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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