A lunar occultation occurs when a celestial object (like the Sun, a star, or a planet) is blocked from our view by our closest neighbor, the moon. Timing lunar occultations help astronomers refine our current knowledge of the lunar topography. Featured below are occultation events involving the moon and some other celestial object.

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Lunar Occultation of the magnitude 1 star Spica timed during its reappearance using a 4-inch f/9 refractor and a Canon 450D DSLR. The time of reappearance occurred at 9:53 pm, as observed from the PAGASA Observatory on March 28, 2013. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

Lunar Occultation of HIP 46774 (6 Leonis) imaged moments before the disappearance using a 4-inch f/9 refractor with 2x barlow and a Philips SPC900NC web camera. Ingress of the 5.06 magnitude star occurred at 9:44 pm as observed from the PAGASA Observatory, March 06, 2012. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

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Jupiter and its moons emerging from behind the moon at around 3:30 am on August 12, 2012, as observed from Quezon City, Philippines.

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Jupiter a few minutes before it disappears behind the moon on August 12, 2012 as observed from Quezon City, Philippines. This image is a post-processed screenshot taken from the video timer setup.

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Jupiter emerging from behind the moon on August 12, 2012 as observed from Quezon City, Philippines. This image is a post-processed screenshot taken from the video timer setup.

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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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