STAMINA 4 SPACE awards DIWATA 2 Testers

ARU Ready (1)
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Prior to the service announcement, a small group of volunteer amateur radio operators worked with the engineers from STAMINA4SPACE Program (formerly named as the PHL-MicroSat Program) to test the full capabilities of DIWATA2’s Amateur Radio Unit. The scope involves testing the receiving (RX) and transmitting (TX) capabilities of the satellite both for voice mode and data mode. It also includes determining the kinds of antennas, the clarity of voice communication, and how much power is actually needed to access the satellite.

Plaques of appreciation were awarded to the first 10 stations to ever access DIWATA 2, and certificates for those involved in the testing efforts.

First 10 Stations to make a successful QSO via DIWATA2 Satellite

  1. Jharwin Barozzo, DV2JHA (Phillippines)
  2. Anthony Guiller Urbano, 4I1AWN (Philippines)
  3. Joseph Petruff, 7J1ADJ/JR6 (Japan)
  4. Afer Shi, BG5UTE (China)
  5. JS6DRQ (Japan)
  6. Iji Yoshitomo, JA6PL (Japan)
  7. Brian Santos, DU1MS (Philippines)
  8. JR6DI (Japan)
  9. Hong Liu, BH4ESB (China)
  10. Stanley Sumping Anak Albert Bejie, 9W8DNX (Malaysia)

For assisting with the testing efforts and achieving one of the firsts QSOs via DIWATA2, special awards were given to

  • Percival Padilla, DV1XWK (Philippines)
  • Lee Castor Canono, D8BVK (Philippines)
  • Veronica Catherine Anak Nohan (9W8VWW, Malaysia)

The awards were given on April 26, 2019, at the Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute Bldg., University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, through AMSAT Philippines president Atty. Eduardo Victor Valdez, PHL-50 project leader Dr. Marc Caesar Talampas, and  STAMINA4SPACE program leader Dr. Joel Joseph Marciano Jr.

The testing team will continue to assist the STAMINA4SPACE program in monitoring the status of DIWATA2’s Amateur Radio Unit.

To learn how to access the DIWATA2 satellite, head directly to Satellite Communications.

Night Sky in Focus
Astronomy and Amateur Radio
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

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My Go-Box for Satellite Work

go box satellites
A go-box is essentially a bunch of radio equipment placed in a box for easy transport and storage. Go-boxes may vary on its size and contents depending on the intended application. To take a look at the go box I use for satellite work, click here.

Related link: About Night Sky in Focus
To view all posts on amateur radio, click here.

Getting Started with Satellite Communications

Welcome to my amateur radio satellite page!

On this page you will find information on how to access amateur radio satellites such as Diwata 2 (PO-101)AO-91AO-92IO-86, and SO-50. By using amateur radio satellites as voice repeater, it is possible to contact fellow satellite operators in nearby countries (such as Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, China, and anywhere in the Philippines) using only a 5W handheld transceiver.

To learn how to access satellite repeaters, head directly to Satellite Communications.

Related link: About Night Sky in Focus
To view all posts on amateur radio, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Call Sign Plate

Each licensed amateur radio operator is awarded with a unique call sign for identification. The National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) requires radio operators to display their call sign in the vicinity of their stations. This call sign plate from the Philippine Amateur Radio Association (PARA) should look nicely when placed beside my amateur radio equipment :)

I have also received a call sign sticker set (for a car’s windshield and radio units) which I will feature in future posts.

No, you can’t use this as vanity car plate (this is a call sign plate, not a vanity car plate)

To learn more about my progress in amateur radio, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

New RF Connectors for FT60

Following the successful signal reception and decoding of the International Space Station’s (ISS) Slow Scan Television (SSTV) images, I am now eager to build a dedicated hi-gain directional antenna for satellite hunting! The first step is getting the signal to and from the radio using proper connectors.

Yaesu FT60 connectors
RG58 coaxial cable >>> PL-259 (plug) >>> SO-239 (socket) to BNC (male) converter >>> BNC (female) to SMA (male) converter >>> SMA (female) connector of Yaesu FT60. For an expanded view, click here.

With these new set of connectors, I can now connect the FT60 to a DIY antenna which I will be building soon!

Note: The configuration can be further simplified using a SO-239 (socket) to SMA (male) converter, but not applicable for my setup as I needed the BNC interface for my other antennas :)

To learn more about my progress in amateur radio, click here.
Related link: Receiving Transmissions from Space
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

SSTV Images Received February 15-17, 2019

Here are the Slow Scan Television (SSTV) images I’ve received from the International Space Station (ISS) from February 15-17, 2019, using a Yaesu FT60 hand-held tranceiver and a smartphone with Robot 36 app as decoder. The audio output of the radio is tapped directly to the microphone input of the smartphone for improved signal decoding.

To lean how to receive SSTV images from the ISS, head directly to Receiving Transmissions from the International Space Station.

To learn more about my progress in amateur radio, click here.
Related link: Amateur Radio

To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Adjusting the Antenna’s Orientation

As a satellite such as the International Space Station (ISS) orbits the Earth, the orientation of its transmitting antenna changes with respect to the Earth. It could have an orientation anywhere from horizontal to vertical. To get a good signal, the Earth-based receiving antenna must match the orientation of the ISS’s transmitting antenna, especially when using only a hand-held tranceiver with stock antenna. An antenna with a pair of elements placed at right angles with each other (such as a cross Yagi or a cross dipole) is best suited for satellite work, because elements at right angles can receive signals from both horizontally and vertically-oriented antennas. In this video, I have demonstrated this effect and shown how changes in antenna orientation affects the strength of the signal received.

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.
To learn more about my progress in amateur radio, click here.

Related link: Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the International Space Station

To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

Scheduled SSTV Transmissions (February 2019)

The International Space Station (ISS) is scheduled to transmit Slow Scan Television (SSTV) images this weekend, as reported in the ARISS-SSTV webpage.

Start: February 15, 8:45 UTC (February 15, 4:45 pm, Philippine Standard Time)
End: February 17, 17:25 UTC (February 18, 1:25 am, Philippine Standard Time)

All ISS passes within this period present opportunities to receive the SSTV transmissions. You can use an app called ISS Detector (for smart phones) or visit the website Heavens-Above to view upcoming passes (do not forget to set the apps to show all passes, and not just the visible ones).

To receive and decode the transmissions, you need a radio receiver capable of tuning to 145.800 MHz and a decoder app such as Robot 36.

ISS pass details (Philippine Standard Time) generated using Heavens Above

Related link: Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the International Space Station

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the ISS

Here’s a short demo on how I used a two-way radio and a smart phone to receive Slow Scan Tele-Vision (SSTV) images from the International Space Station (SSTV) as it orbits the Earth at a height of about 400 km. The transmission was received on February 9, at around 8 am local time, from Bacoor City, Cavite.

Equipment: Yaesu FT60
Decoder app: Robot 36
ISS locator app: ISS Detector
Frequency: 145.8 MHz

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.
To learn more about my progress in amateur radio, click here.

Related link: Receiving Transmissions from Space

To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

SSTV Image from the ISS (October 29, 2018)

SSTV October 29, 2018, 241 am 4G1AWN
SSTV image received and decoded from the International Space Station (ISS) as it passes over the Philippines on October 29, 2018, around 2:41 local time

The International Space Station (ISS) has been transmitting images since October 28 and will continue to do so in the next few days. It transmits in SSTV format—the same format used to send images to Earth during the Apollo missions. The transmissions can be received with any radio tuned at 145.8 MHz, and a decoder app such as Robot 36 (try installing that app and decode this recording).

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here. To learn more about my progress in amateur radio, click here© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)