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Category: Asteroid


2012DA14_flyby

An animation of the asteroid 2012 DA14 showing its movement against the background of stars during its closest approach to Earth on February 16, 2013. Images taken at approximately 30-second interval, with each image captured at 6-sec exposure, ISO 1600, using a 50 mm f/1.8 prime lens. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of asteroids’ close approach to Earth, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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spaceaffairsbureau_thailand_featuredphoto

A composite image (screenshot) showing the website’s header and the section where the photo was used

My DA14 asteroid photo was featured in an article published by the Space Affairs Bureau of Thailand. I had to use a translator to make sense of the unfamiliar characters in their native language. The Space Affairs Bureau (SAB) is Thailand’s leading agency on matters related to space education and its promotion, research and development of space technology and infrastructure, and space-related operations.

For other featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

2012DA14stargazing

Hunting the asteroid 2012 DA14 during its closest approach on February 16, 2013 at the Manila Observatory, with fellow members of the Philippine Astronomical Society (PAS), Edward Von Delelis and Kashogi Astapan, along with observers from the Ateneo de Manila University. We were able to observe the magnitude 7 asteroid as it zooms past Earth both visually and photographically using a 4-inch f/9 refractor and a 40 mm eyepiece. Tracking was done manually using an 8×50 finderscope and the slow-motion controls of a Kenko NES mount. For previous observations, click here.

Related link: Asteroid 2012DA14 Captured from Quezon City

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Images of the asteroid 2012 DA14 during its closest approach earlier today, captured from Quezon City, Philippines, taken with a Canon 450D DSLR, 50 mm f/1.8 lens (set to f/1.8), ISO 1600, 6 seconds exposure.

2012DA14_anthonyurbano

Asteroid 2012 DA14 captured from Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For an animated image, click here.

2012DA14_330am

Asteroid 2012 DA14 captured from Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

2012DA14_330a

Asteroid 2012 DA14 captured from Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

For more images of asteroids, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Great news for fellow Philippine-based observers and amateur astronomers! The Asteroid 2012 DA14, the biggest space object to get so close to the Earth since regular sky surveys began in 1990’s, will be visible from our location on its closest approach to Earth on February 16, 2013, around 3 am local time.

NEAFlybyChart_c_HeavenAbove

Star chart generated through the web site Heavens-Above showing the path of the asteroid as viewed from the Philippines and the rest of the South East Asian region

Only a pair of binoculars is needed to see the asteroid. During its closest approach, it will  peak at magnitude 7.5 (just beyond naked-eye visibility), moving at a rate of 0.8 degrees for every 45 seconds; in context, our moon’s angular diameter is just 0.5 degrees!

600px-2012da14-news174_nasa

Path of near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14 on its closest approach to Earth on February 15, 2013 (February 16 local time); image released to public domain by NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office

DSLR owners might also want to try to image the passage of the asteroid. A 50 mm f1.8 lens mounted on any DSLR should be powerful enough to capture it. Mount the camera onto a tripod, set the ISO to maximum (e.g. 1600), set the aperture to widest (e.g. f/1.8), focus the camera manually to infinity, set the exposure to about 3 to 6 seconds (adjust exposure as necessary), use remote shutter or the time-delay function, point the camera at the asteroid’s predicted location (refer to star chart above), then press the shutter when ready. Take photos one minute apart. Background stars will remain stationary, but the asteroid will appear as a rapidly-moving dot heading towards north.You can actually compile images and do a time lapse :)

If weather permits, I will attempt to photograph 2012 DA14 through my telescope. Follow this blog to keep you posted, or leave a note to join me in my observation. Clear skies!

For previous observations, click here.
For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Image of asteroid 433 Eros during it closest approach to Earth, taken last January 30, 2012 using a 4-in f/9 refractor and a Canon 450D DSLR. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of asteroids, click here.

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