My Go-Box for Satellite Work

go box satellites
A go-box is essentially a bunch of radio equipment placed in a box for easy transport and storage. Go-boxes may vary on its size and contents depending on the intended application. To take a look at the go box I use for satellite work, click here.

Related link: About Night Sky in Focus
To view all posts on amateur radio, click here.

Advertisements

Apollo 11 Command Module

We’ve visited the Philippine Air Force Aerospace Museum at the Villamor Air Base in Pasay City. The museum features a comprehensive history of the various aircraft and aircraft-related artifacts of the Philippine Air Force, as well as an outdoor exhibit of actual decommissioned aircraft. We were surprised to see a full-size model of the Apollo 11 Command Module in the museum.

Philippine Air Force Aerospace Museum (1)
A scale model of the Apollo 11 Command Module (CM)

To view more photos of this visit, head directly to my other blog.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Exclusive Stargazing Event

A stargazing event could easily become the highlight of your exclusive event (such a birthday party, a wedding, a company event, or any other personal event).

supermoon_november_14_2016-1
Looking at the moon through a telescope

The stargazing package may include the following depending on the sky conditions:

1. Moon Astrophotography using the Telescope (1 hour)
2. Basic Stargazing and Finding Constellations (1 hour)
3. Planet Viewing using the Telescope—-Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Venus (1 hour)

The details of each part is explained below:

1. Moon Astrophotography

Using the telescope, we will view the moon and take up-close pictures of it (any mobile phone camera can very well do this). Through a telescope, you can clearly see the craters of the moon. Everyone will surely be amazed. You can ask your guests to upload photos of the moon in social media to boost interest. The views and photos your guests will be getting will rival those taken by professional photographers. Moon viewing and photography alone can make your event a unique and truly wonderful experience.


2. Basic Stargazing and Finding Constellations

Your guests will gather around and I will teach them the constellations. We will use a flashlight with red cellophane cover to read maps of the heaven. I will prepare star maps for the specific date you are requesting. These maps will be used by your guests to navigate the night sky. I will then use a powerful laser to point at the stars and constellations as the participants identify them using their maps (this is called star-hopping). I will show them the planets that can be seen with the naked eye. And lastly, I will teach them how to find north without using a compass, but by using the star, Polaris.

3. Planet Viewing using a Powerful Telescope

Several planets are usually visible each night. If visible (it depends on the time of the night and the month of the year), we will use a telescope to look at Jupiter and 4 of its brightest moons, Saturn with its rings, Venus, and Mars.

Important:

As with all stargazing events, if it rains, then we will not see the moon, the stars, and the planets (clouds prevent us from seeing them). This is a very real possibility, thus, must be anticipated. If this happens, I have prepared 2 lectures for your guests, which we can conduct on any covered space (will need a projector and a microphone). The lecture part is just a backup and will not be conducted if the sky is clear.

Let me know if you have any questions. This could be one of the most memorable stargazing events you and your guest could get to experience (and if you receive good feedback, I’d be happy to work with you on a future stargazing events).

To request an exclusive stargazing event, email: aeurbano@up.edu.ph or call 09954997030.

To view our previous observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

Total Lunar Eclipse (January 31, 2018)

Total Lunar Eclipse January 31 2018
Total Lunar Eclipse taken with a 4-inch f/9 refractor and a DSLR camera on January 31, 2018 at the PAGASA Observatory in UP Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Moon joins the five planets this weekend

Try to spot the alignment of the five planets as the moon joins them this weekend!

January_30_2016_alignment
To view a larger image, click here. The event will be visible in the next few weeks, but the best dates to observe are from January 30 to February 6, when the moon joins the alignment. This image shows what the eastern sky should look like on January 30, 2016, at 5:30 am (Image generated using Stellarium).

The alignment of the five planets can be seen from anywhere in the country (and in most parts of the world). It should be visible for as long as you have a clear view of the eastern horizon, and there are no clouds to block your view. It also does not require any special equipment such as telescopes or binoculars. One may simply observe this event from home, from his or her own backyard, using nothing but the eyes.

To view the alignment, simply:

1. Wake up at 5:30 am (your local time) on January 30, 2016.
2. Face east (Silangan). If you do not know where east is, simply use a compass or ask someone to show you the direction where the sun rises (kung saan sumisikat ang araw).
3. Use the map to find the moon first. Once you’ve spotted the moon, it will be very easy to find the rest of the planets.
4. Find the “bright star” to the upper-right of the moon. That “bright star” is actually the planet Jupiter.
5. Find another “bright star” to the lower-left of the moon. That “bright star” is actually the planet Venus.
6. Use the map to find the rest of the planets: Saturn (yellow), Mars (red), and Mercury (white).

The alignment will still be visible in the next few weeks, but the best dates to observe are from January 30 to February 6, when the moon joins them (which makes it easier to locate the planets). As viewed from Earth, the planets and the moon appear to line up, but in reality, they are separated by vast distances.

Keep track of the ‘sky events’ that can be observed from your own backyard! To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.
For previous observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Observation at UP Town Center on October 24, 2015

Manila_Street_Astronomers
Free public observation at the UP Town Center on October 24, 2015, 7-9 pm

See the moon through a telescope!

Manila Street Astronomers will be holding a free public observation at the UP Town Center, Diliman, Quezon City on October 24, 2015, 7-10 pm. For inquiries, kindly leave a comment below.

For previous observations, click here.
To keep you posted on upcoming events, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Sidewalk Astronomy at Rizal Park on October 10, 2015

UP_Astrosoc_Sidewalk_Astronomy_Rizal_Park_Oct_2015
Sidewalk Astronomy on October 10, 2015, at Rizal Park (Luneta). For inquiries, please contact the UP Astronomical Society.

In celebration of the 2015 World Space Week, the UP Astronomical Society (UP AstroSoc) will be holding a free public stargazing event called Sidewalk Astronomy at Rizal Park (Luneta) on October 10, 2015, from 3:30 – 8:30 pm. By bringing astronomy to the sidewalk, participants get a chance to see some celestial objects through various telescopes (weather permitting) and learn more about astronomy topics such as constellations, solar system, space exploration, and many others.

UP AstroSoc regularly holds outreach events geared towards broadening the awareness, interest, knowledge, and understanding of astronomy among students and the general public. For inquiries, please contact the UP Astronomical Society.

For previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Moon Observed at SM Southmall

Astronomy enthusiasts from Manila Street Astronomers (MSA) held a free public observation on September 19, 2015, from 7 pm to 9 pm, at SM Southmall, Las Piñas, in celebration of the International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN). Various astronomical organizations around the world participate in this annual event by holding free public observations geared towards the appreciation of our moon.

MSA conducts regular public observations and will be holding another one on September 26, 2015, from 7 to 9 pm, at SM Southmall (parking lot near Food Street), Las Piñas.

For previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)