Video of Venus-Jupiter pair from Cavite (January 16, 2019)

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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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Venus and Jupiter Pair Up in the Sky

This is an ongoing sky event. Watch a video of the event taken on January 16, 5:30 am, in Bacoor, Cavite.

Venus and Jupiter will appear close together in the sky, from January 16 to 27, 2019, visible in the Philippines and most parts of the world. These two planets can be seen with the naked eye, no telescopes needed. A mobile phone camera should be adequate enough to capture this event (if you use a DSLR, then perhaps you can capture a photo of you with the planets in the background).

Information on how to spot the planets are provided below:

venus - jupiter conjunction january 2019
Visible anywhere in the Philippines (and most parts of the world), no telescopes needed, just use your eyes!

How to spot the pairing of Jupiter and Venus

1. Wake up early. The planet pair is best viewed at around 5:30 am (Philippine Standard Time), from January 16 to 27, 2019.
2. Face the eastern horizon. Pick a good spot, free of any obstruction. If there is a structure such as house or building, you might not be able to see the pairing.
3. If you plan to observe the event every day, make sure to take a photo (or at least try to draw their position). Include the bright stars in your sketch. You should notice that every day, the position of the two changes! That is exactly how early astronomers were able to figure out that they are planets, and not stars (they do seem to wander, that’s why they are called wanderer—or planets! Google it up!)

Let’s hope for clear skies! Don’t forget to share this post! Wake up everyone, this is a rare astronomical event!!

To keep posted with astronomical events visible in the Philippines, visit my blog site (run by a local amateur astronomer and astrophotographer) www.nightskyinfocus.com.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Moon joins the five planets this weekend

Try to spot the alignment of the five planets as the moon joins them this weekend!

January_30_2016_alignment
To view a larger image, click here. The event will be visible in the next few weeks, but the best dates to observe are from January 30 to February 6, when the moon joins the alignment. This image shows what the eastern sky should look like on January 30, 2016, at 5:30 am (Image generated using Stellarium).

The alignment of the five planets can be seen from anywhere in the country (and in most parts of the world). It should be visible for as long as you have a clear view of the eastern horizon, and there are no clouds to block your view. It also does not require any special equipment such as telescopes or binoculars. One may simply observe this event from home, from his or her own backyard, using nothing but the eyes.

To view the alignment, simply:

1. Wake up at 5:30 am (your local time) on January 30, 2016.
2. Face east (Silangan). If you do not know where east is, simply use a compass or ask someone to show you the direction where the sun rises (kung saan sumisikat ang araw).
3. Use the map to find the moon first. Once you’ve spotted the moon, it will be very easy to find the rest of the planets.
4. Find the “bright star” to the upper-right of the moon. That “bright star” is actually the planet Jupiter.
5. Find another “bright star” to the lower-left of the moon. That “bright star” is actually the planet Venus.
6. Use the map to find the rest of the planets: Saturn (yellow), Mars (red), and Mercury (white).

The alignment will still be visible in the next few weeks, but the best dates to observe are from January 30 to February 6, when the moon joins them (which makes it easier to locate the planets). As viewed from Earth, the planets and the moon appear to line up, but in reality, they are separated by vast distances.

Keep track of the ‘sky events’ that can be observed from your own backyard! To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.
For previous observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Close Pairing of Venus and Jupiter

Venus_Jupiter_pairing_July1,2015
Click on the photo to view full resolution. Through a telescope, the crescent shape of Venus (left) and the cloud bands of Jupiter (right) become visible, as well as the moons that orbit around Jupiter. Image taken from Quezon City, Philippines, using a Canon 450D DSLR mounted on a 4-in f/9 refractor, ISO 1600, 1/200 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of close pairing of celestial objects, click here.

To the naked eye, Venus and Jupiter look very similar to stars. Through a telescope, however, the crescent shape of Venus and the cloud bands of Jupiter are revealed, as well as the moons that orbit Jupiter.

Close pairing occurs whenever two or more celestial objects (which could be a planet, a star, or the moon) appear to be in the same direction in the sky as viewed from Earth. While they would seem to be very close to each other (as in the case Venus and Jupiter), in reality, they are separated by vast distances.

To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.
For more images of close pairing of celestial objects, click here.

Related link: How to see Jupiter and Venus this July

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

How to see Jupiter and Venus this July

Jupiter_Venus_close_pairing_June26,2015
Starting today until the second week of July 2015, Venus and Jupiter can be seen like bright stars above the western horizon. No special equipment is needed to see the two planets. The photo above was taken at around 6:30 pm on June 26, 2015, from Rizal, Philippines. You, too, can see them for yourself. Read the instructions below on how to find Venus and Jupiter.

On the first and second week of July 2015, face west at around 6 to 7 pm and you will notice two bright ‘stars’ above the horizon. Those ‘stars’ are not actual stars, but rather, the planets Jupiter and Venus. You will see the two planets as a pair of lights in the sky (the brighter one is Venus and the dimmer one is Jupiter), very similar to what is shown in the photo above. You may observe the pairing of the two planets every day, but make sure to look at them on July 1, when the ‘gap’ between the two planets is smallest.

On July 18, the moon will join Venus and Jupiter to form one of the most interesting sights you can see in the sky: a ‘celestial triangle’. A recent ‘celestial triangle’ was seen on August 24, 2014. Your chance to see the next one will be on July 18, 2015. Simply face west at around 6 to 7 pm and see the moon, Venus, and Jupiter form a triangle as shown in the simulated image below.

Venus-Moon-Jupiter_July 18,2015
Venus, Jupiter, and the Moon form a triangle on July 18, 2015.

No special equipment is needed to see these events. Also, they can be viewed from anywhere in the Philippines. If you were able to witness the event or take a photograph of it, tell us about your experience by leaving a comment below. Clear skies!

To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here. Take a look at other similar, previously-observed planetary pairing and grouping here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Mars, Venus, and Moon Celestial Grouping

grouping-mars-venus-moon
Image of Mars-Venus-Moon celestial grouping on February 20, 2015, taken at around 6 pm from Quezon City, Philippines. Canon 450D, 50 mm lens, f/3.5, ISO 1600, 1/5 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more celestial grouping images, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)