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Category: Filter


solar_shades

Specialized shades for viewing the Sun during solar eclipses. Without proper filters, looking directly at the Sun will result to permanent eye damage.

I have just finished making a couple of solar shades for the upcoming solar eclipse on March 9, 2016. To learn more about the specialized safety filter I used in this solar shade and what other low-cost alternative can be used, click here.

Related links:
Solar Eclipse on March 9, 2016
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Solar Filter

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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In this article, I will describe how I modified a Canon 1000D (Rebel XS) DSLR to become a dedicated astronomical camera, with all functions intact including its auto-focus capabilities, and thus, may still be used for non-astronomical purposes. The camera belongs to a fellow astronomy enthusiast and I was happy to accommodate the request to have it modified. It took me around 2 hours to complete the modification.

Canon 1000D Rebel XS DSLR Modification (1)

Canon 1000D DSLR modified for astrophotography

The modification involves the replacement of the camera’s stock (built-in) filter with a Baader BCF (Baader Conversion Filter). This filter allows greater sensitivity to H-alpha wavelengths emitted by most deep-sky objects, while at the same time eliminate unwanted UV and other IR wavelengths. This filter is necessary for any system that uses lenses in the optical train. To learn about the key steps involved in this camera modification, click here.

To view other my other DSLR modification projects, follow the links below:
August 2014 Modified Canon 450D DSLR for Astro-imaging (improved sealed chamber prototype)
March 2014 Modified Canon 450D DSLR for Astro-imaging (sealed chamber prototype)
February 2014 Modified Canon 1000D DSLR (Baader BCF filter replacement)
December 2013 Modified Canon 450D DSLR for Astro-imaging (custom-fabricated lens mount)
November 2013 Modified Canon 450D DSLR for  Astro-imaging (sealed chamber prototype)
February 2013 Modified Canon 450D DSLR for Astro-imaging

For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
To visit my astrophoto gallery, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Observing the sun requires a special type of protective filter called a solar filter. Such filters work by passing sunlight through specialized layer of metal, placed in between layers of glass or plastic film. Solar filters block more than 99.99% of sunlight, and must be placed on top of the telescope’s objective (on the main aperture of the telescope) to reduce the sunlight’s intensity before it gets focused by the telescope. Without a solar filter, sunlight’s intensity will be high enough to cause loss of vision and damage to equipment.

filter_solar

Observing and imaging the sun require a solar filter

To learn how to construct a mounting frame (also called a filter cell) for a solar filter, which will help protect the delicate film and allow safe viewing (and imaging) of the sun, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Wide-field image of the Veil Nebula taken with a 50 mm kit lens equipped with an OIII filter using a Canon 450D DSLR, 2 x 180 sec exp, IS0 1600, Kenko NES mount. April 15, 2012. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

 

A 30-minute exposure with an OIII filter shows the fine thread-like structure of the Veil Nebula, a supernova remnant in the constellation Cygnus. The narrow-band filter helps cut through the severe light pollution in the city. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 4 x 480 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 15, 2012. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of nebula, click here.

I am heading to the province tonight for some DSO hunting: diffused and planetary nebula! Hope it will be as productive as last December’s deep-sky hunt. It will be a long 8-hour trip.

With an OIII narrow-band filter which is particularly useful in improving contrast in diffused and planetary nebula, I might actually have a chance to finally have a glimpse of the elusive Veil nebula :)

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