SSTV Images Received February 15-17, 2019

Here are the Slow Scan Television (SSTV) images I’ve received from the International Space Station (ISS) from February 15-17, 2019, using a Yaesu FT60 hand-held tranceiver and a smartphone with Robot 36 app as decoder. The audio output of the radio is tapped directly to the microphone input of the smartphone for improved signal decoding.

To lean how to receive SSTV images from the ISS, head directly to Receiving Transmissions from the International Space Station.

Related link: Amateur Radio

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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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Adjusting the Antenna’s Orientation

As a satellite such as the International Space Station (ISS) orbits the Earth, the orientation of its transmitting antenna changes with respect to the Earth. It could have an orientation anywhere from horizontal to vertical. To get a good signal, the Earth-based receiving antenna must match the orientation of the ISS’s transmitting antenna, especially when using only a hand-held tranceiver with stock antenna. An antenna with a pair of elements placed at right angles with each other (such as a cross Yagi or a cross dipole) is best suited for satellite work, because elements at right angles can receive signals from both horizontally and vertically-oriented antennas. In this video, I have demonstrated this effect and shown how changes in antenna orientation affects the strength of the signal received.

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.

Related link: Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the International Space Station

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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

Scheduled SSTV Transmissions (February 2019)

The International Space Station (ISS) is scheduled to transmit Slow Scan Television (SSTV) images this weekend, as reported in the ARISS-SSTV webpage.

Start: February 15, 8:45 UTC (February 15, 4:45 pm, Philippine Standard Time)
End: February 17, 17:25 UTC (February 18, 1:25 am, Philippine Standard Time)

All ISS passes within this period present opportunities to receive the SSTV transmissions. You can use an app called ISS Detector (for smart phones) or visit the website Heavens-Above to view upcoming passes (do not forget to set the apps to show all passes, and not just the visible ones).

To receive and decode the transmissions, you need a radio receiver capable of tuning to 145.800 MHz and a decoder app such as Robot 36.

ISS pass details (Philippine Standard Time) generated using Heavens Above

Related link: Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the International Space Station

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

SSTV Image from the ISS (October 29, 2018)

SSTV October 29, 2018, 241 am 4G1AWN
SSTV image received and decoded from the International Space Station (ISS) as it passes over the Philippines on October 29, 2018, around 2:41 local time

The International Space Station (ISS) has been transmitting images since October 28 and will continue to do so in the next few days. It transmits in SSTV format—the same format used to send images to Earth during the Apollo missions. The transmissions can be received with any radio tuned at 145.8 MHz, and a decoder app such as Robot 36 (try installing that app and decode this recording).

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

International Space Station (ISS) November 11, 2012

International Space Station (ISS) flyby over Antipolo, Philippines on November 11, 2012 at around 5 am, taken with a Canon 450D and an 18-55 mm kit lens set at 18 mm, 60 sec exposure, ISO 1600. Image taken as the ISS rises from the southwest.  Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano
International Space Station (ISS) flyby over Antipolo, Philippines on November 11, 2012 at around 5 am, taken with a Canon 450D and an 18-55 mm kit lens set at 18 mm, 30 sec exposure, ISO 1600. Image taken as the ISS sets in the north-northeast.  Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

For more ISS flyby images, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

ISS to Zoom Past Philippines on November 11, 2015

Predictions courtesy of Heavens-Above, developed and maintained by Chris Peat.

The International Space Station (ISS) currently orbiting approximately 400 kilometers above the Earth’s surface will treat us with yet another spectacular sight on the early morning of November 11, 2012, as it zooms past, for the second time this week, above the Philippines.

The satellite will be visible to us because its solar panels will be geometrically well-placed to reflect sunlight towards the ground, acting like giant space mirrors. From the ground, it will look like a very bright flare coming from the southwestern horizon and then slowly (much like an airplane) move towards the north-northeastern horizon until it disappears from view. It will be visible for approximately 6 minutes, from 04:57:09 am to 05:05:49 am and will be visible to the naked eye. No special equipment is required to observe the satellite flyby. For previous ISS observations, click here.

Related link: ISS Flyby November 3, 2012

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

International Space Station Flyby (November 3, 2012)

International Space Station (ISS) captured as it zooms 412 kilometers above the Philippines during its brief flyby from 6:11 pm to 6:18 pm on November 3, 2012. Image taken with a 4-in f/9 refractor with a 2x Barlow and a Canon 450D DSLR, 1/160 sec exposure, ISO 1600, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For previous ISS observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)