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Category: Planets


venus_laser

A green laser points at Venus, currently visible in the western horizon about an hour after sunset. This photo was taken on November 30, 2016 from the observing deck of Seven Suites Hotel Observatory in Antipolo.

Lately, you might have noticed what appears to be a very bright star prominently visible in the western horizon about an hour after sunset. This ‘star’ is in fact the planet Venus.

Venus is the brightest among the five planets (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn) that can be seen with the naked eye. The planet will continue to be prominent in the sky until around March 2017.

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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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Photo of Saturn taken on May 8, 2016 through eyepiece projection with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Logitech Pro 4000 web camera. The gap between the rings of Saturn (called the Cassini Division), is visible in this photo.

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Photo of Saturn taken on May 8, 2016. Image captured through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Logitech Pro 4000 web camera. Processed using AutoStakkert and Registax. For more images of planets, click here. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Photo of Mars taken on May 5, 2016 through eyepiece projection with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and an SPC900NC/00 web camera. The polar ice cap, the dark and the bright areas, and the clouds on Mars are visible in the photo.

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The polar ice cap, the light and dark areas, and the clouds on Mars are visible in this photo. For more images of planets, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Here are some photos of last night’s public observation conducted by the Astronomical League of the Philippines and the Manila Street Astronomers at the SM Mall of Asia, Pasay City, featuring the planets Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars.

For a list of upcoming events and previous observations, click here.
To keep posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Jupiter_12March2016

Photo of Jupiter taken on March 12, 2016, through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Canon 1100D DSLR (in video mode). Jupiter’s cloud bands and the Great Red Spot are visible in this photo. For other images of planets, click here. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus_Jupiter_pairing_July1,2015

Click on the photo to view full resolution. Through a telescope, the crescent shape of Venus (left) and the cloud bands of Jupiter (right) become visible, as well as the moons that orbit around Jupiter. Image taken from Quezon City, Philippines, using a Canon 450D DSLR mounted on a 4-in f/9 refractor, ISO 1600, 1/200 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of close pairing of celestial objects, click here.

To the naked eye, Venus and Jupiter look very similar to stars. Through a telescope, however, the crescent shape of Venus and the cloud bands of Jupiter are revealed, as well as the moons that orbit Jupiter.

Close pairing occurs whenever two or more celestial objects (which could be a planet, a star, or the moon) appear to be in the same direction in the sky as viewed from Earth. While they would seem to be very close to each other (as in the case Venus and Jupiter), in reality, they are separated by vast distances.

To keep you posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.
For more images of close pairing of celestial objects, click here.

Related link: How to see Jupiter and Venus this July

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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