SSTV from the International Space Station (ISS)

The International Space Station (ISS) recently conducted a week-long radio transmissions test by sending encoded signals in Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmission format to be decoded by anyone with the proper amateur radio equipment tuned at 145.8 MHz and an SSTV decoder app such as Robot 36.

Certificates are given to stations who have successfully decoded SSTV images from ISS

SSTV images are sent and decoded line by line, much like how scanners and printers work.

Image received from the ISS

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Night Sky in Focus | Astronomy and Amateur Radio
© Anthony Urbano | Manila, Philippines

PSAT2 Satellite SSTV Images

PSAT2 transmits SSTV images at 435.360 MHz (UHF) which may be received using just a DIY Moxon-Yagi satellite antenna, a UHF radio, and a decoder such as Robot 36 running on a smartphone (Android). Here is an image decoded in May 2020, as PSAT2 passes over the Philippines.

SSTV image from PSAT2

SSTV transmission by PSAT2 is active only at daytime. Doppler-effect compensation is necessary to properly receive the transmission. Tune the radio at 435.370 to 435.350 MHz from start to end of the pass. You may decode up to two SSTV images per pass. To watch a a demo video click here.

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Night Sky in Focus | Astronomy and Amateur Radio
© Anthony Urbano | Manila, Philippines