Rekindling Venus (A Free Public-Viewing Event)

A collaboration of RTU Astrosoc, UP Astrosoc, and UPLB Astrosoc in partnership with the Australian embassy, Manila, and DOST-PAGASA.

For more information, please visit the event page.

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Solar Observation (May 13, 2012)

Earlier today joined a solar observation with the University of the Philippines Astronomical Society (May 13, 2012) in preparation for the upcoming May 21, 2012 annular solar eclipse and the most awaited June 6, 2102 Venus transit.

Solar observation with the UP Astronomical Society on May 13, 2012.

Astronomical observations are geared towards sharing astronomy with the general public. It is free and is open to everyone! Take a look at our previous observations. You may join scheduled observations, or you may even request one for your school! Send me a note at eteny@nightskyinfocus.com.

To keep you posted on upcoming events, click here .

Related links:
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on TV 5 (October 8, 2014)
Solar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 24, 2013)
Lunar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 23, 2013)
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on ABS-CBN (June 16, 2011)

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

DSO-hunting under light-polluted sky

As part of the UP Astronomical Society’s 2012 Members’ Lecture Series, we hunted some DSO’s on April 20, 2012, at the PAGASA Astronomical Observatory in UP Diliman, Quezon City.

DSO Lecture UP Astrosoc
DSO-hunting with UP Astrosoc

We have successfully viewed the following objects in a severely light-polluted sky using only a 4-inch telescope!

M4 globular cluster, M6 (Butterfly Cluster) open cluster, M7 (Ptolemy’s Cluster) open cluster, M8 Lagoon Nebula (diffuse nebula), M20 Trifid Nebula (diffuse nebula), M21 open cluster, M13 (Hercules Cluster) globular cluster, M92 globular cluster, M57 (Ring Nebula) planetary nebula, M27 (Dumbell Nebula) planetary nebula, Albireo double star, Mizar double star, Cor Caroli double star, Coathanger asterism, and the Milky Way!

For previous observations, click here.
For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus April 8, 2012

venus_8april2012
Venus imaged last April 8, 2012 using a Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor on a Kenko NES mount, projection via 25 mm eyepiece and a Philips SPC900NC webcam. Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of Venus, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Supernova SN 2012aw April 8, 2012

Image of the supernova SN 2012aw (currently at magnitude 13.3) discovered by an Italian astronomer Paolo Fagotti last March 17, 2012 in M95 galaxy in the constellation Leo. The spiral arms of the galaxy to which the supernova belongs to is barely visible in this photo. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 5 x 90 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 8, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of supernova, click here.

Albireo Double Star in Cygnus April 7, 2012

gallery_double_star_albireo_april7-2012
Albireo is arguably one of the most beautiful double star within reach of a small telescope. It is located halfway between the stars Vega and Altair, along the region of the sky where the Milky Way stretches towards north. The main attraction of this system is the color contrast: the primary is a giant orange spectral type K star, while the secondary is a hot blue spectral type B star. The pair is relatively easy to split even with small telescopes and is best viewed with a little bit of sky glow (e.g., during full moon) to help the eyes appreciate the colors. Image taken with a Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 15 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 7, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

 

For previous observations, click here.
For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines