Super Moon March 2019

Supermoon with Chocobo
Observing the super moon with our pet rooster

We’ve observed last night’s super moon using a 4-inch f/9 telescope. While it is true that the moon will be closer to Earth during a super moon, the difference in size and brightness compared to a non-super moon is so small and so subtle that it will be very difficult to detect such an almost negligible difference, even for amateur astronomers who regularly observe the moon, and use astronomical equipment such as a telescope.

For previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

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Moon, Venus, and Jupiter (January 2019)

As described in a previous post, the Moon, along with the two planets Jupiter and Venus, form a celestial triangle, visible anywhere in the Philippines and in most parts of the world. If you missed this event earlier today, you may still catch it tomorrow (by tomorrow, the moon has moved a bit already, thus, you will see a different configuration).

moon-venus-jupiter_31_january_2019
From top to bottom: Moon, Jupiter, and Venus (January 31, 2019, Bacoor, Cavite)

No special equipment needed to view a celestial grouping of the moon and planets. To view more photos of celestial pairings and groupings, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus and Jupiter in the Early Morning Sky

Venus and Jupiter pair continues to dazzle early risers as the planets form an impressive sight this month of January until early February. This event is visible all throughout the Philippines and in most parts of the world. For information on how to spot this celestial event, click here.

Taken with a DSLR camera earlier today, January 19, 2019, 5 am, from Bacoor, Cavite, Philippines

To keep posted with astronomical events visible in the Philippines, visit my blog site (run by a local amateur astronomer and astrophotographer) www.nightskyinfocus.com.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus-Jupiter Conjunction (January 2019)

venus - jupiter pair january 19, 2019
Venus-Jupiter pair (conjuction) in the morning sky, visible from the Philippines and in most parts of the world (image taken on January 16, 2019, from Bacoor, Cavite). For more photos of celestial groupings, click here.

The Venus-Jupiter pair (or what astronomers refer to as conjunction) can now be seen in the early morning sky. The two planets, in reality, are separated by vast distances. It just so happened that currently, the two planets are found in the same general direction, creating the illusion that they are close to each other. The separation will be smallest on January 23, 2019 (best viewed from 4 am to 6 am). Another notable event occurs on January 31, when the moon joins the two planets to form a celestial triangle.

For instructions on how to observe this event, click here. For more photos of celestial groupings, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

 

 

Moon joins Venus and Jupiter on Jan 31, 2019

In a previous post, I’ve described how to observe the pairing of Venus and Jupiter, best viewed from January 16 to 27, 2019. On January 31, 5:30 am, the two planets will be joined by the moon to form a celestial triangle. This is one of the most fascinating sights in amateur astronomy, do not miss it! On February 1 (a day after), the moon will still be in the general direction of the two planets, but will not form an impressive triangle as in January 31.

moon-venus-jupiter conjunction january 31 2019
Face east at 5:30 am on January 31, 2019

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Pentax 10 × 50 SP WP Binoculars

Any two identical telescopes placed side-by-side is considered a pair of binoculars, from the words bin which means “two” and ocular which means “of or connected with the eyes or vision”.

pentax_10x50_sp_wp
Pentax 10 × 50 SP WP, the newest addition to my astro-equipment.

Like many other astronomy enthusiasts, I also recommend investing on a pair of binoculars first before buying a telescope. Any pair of 7 × 50 or 10 × 50 binoculars should be more than adequate for exploring the night sky particularly the Milky Way.

Early this year, I have acquired a Pentax 10 × 50 SP WP. I have been testing it for more than 8 months now, and I am very much pleased with its built quality and more importantly, the optical quality of the lenses. In future posts, I’ll be sharing some of the insights I gained in the process of choosing this pair, such as the features and specifications I’d recommended for a pair that will be used for astronomical observations.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Zodiacal Lights in Calapan (July 7, 2016)

I have finally seen and photographed the zodiacal lights (diffused white glow in the night sky caused by the reflection of sunlight on dust particles orbiting the Sun) from Calapan City, in the island of Mindoro. Since the zodiacal lights’ glow is much fainter than the Milky Way and only visible in places with pristine dark sky, this phenomenon is very rarely observed by astronomy enthusiasts.

Zodiacal_Light_Calapan_July_2016
The zodiacal lights captured in this photo appears as a diffused white glow extending from the eastern horizon towards the plane of the ecliptic (in the direction of Pleiades and Aldebaran), as seen from the island of Mindoro, Philippines. This image was taken at around 4 am on July 7, 2016 (about 2 hours before the local sunrise), using a Canon 1100D DSLR, 18-55 mm lens f/3.5, at ISO 400 at 63 sec exposure.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Global Astronomy Month (April 2016)

Manila Street Astronomers (MSA) celebrates Global Astronomy Month this April by conducting a series of free public observations in various places in Metro Manila. Below are some of the photos taken yesterday during the observation at the UP Town Center in Diliman, QC.

For more photos, click here.

MSA conducts regular public observations and will be holding another one tonight, April 24, 2016, from 7 to 9 pm, at the Alabang Town Center in Muntinlupa.

For previous observations, click here.
To keep posted on upcoming astronomical events, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

Celestron Travel Scope 70

The Celestron Travel Scope 70 is a small telescope designed for viewing distant land-based targets (such as birds and trees) and for casual astronomical observations. While many enthusiasts would purchase this telescope perhaps as a grab-and-go telescope, my intention for acquiring one is different since I intend to use it as a guide scope for my autoguider setup (if you want to know more about it, click here).

I have been using this telescope for several months now, and I believe I now have a firm grasp of what it can and cannot do, and its advantages and disadvantages. In this article, I intend to share some of my insights about the Celestron Travel Scope 70, particularly in the context of visual observation and astrophotography.

CelestronTravelScope70
Celestron Travel Scope 70 used during a public observation (left). Actual moon image taken with a Celestron Travel Scope 70 (right).

To learn more about the Celestron Travel Scope 70 and how it can be used to photograph the Sun, the Moon, and the moons of Jupiter, click here.

If you would like to know more about amateur astronomy and astrophotography, kindly follow the link: Getting Started.

For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)