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Category: Webcam Imaging


Photo of Saturn taken on May 8, 2016 through eyepiece projection with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Logitech Pro 4000 web camera. The gap between the rings of Saturn (called the Cassini Division), is visible in this photo.

saturn_may8_2016_logitech4000-2

Photo of Saturn taken on May 8, 2016. Image captured through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Logitech Pro 4000 web camera. Processed using AutoStakkert and Registax. For more images of planets, click here. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano.

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For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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Photo of Mars taken on May 5, 2016 through eyepiece projection with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and an SPC900NC/00 web camera. The polar ice cap, the dark and the bright areas, and the clouds on Mars are visible in the photo.

mars_may5_2016

The polar ice cap, the light and dark areas, and the clouds on Mars are visible in this photo. For more images of planets, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Images of the active region (AR) 2192 sunspot group on October 26, 2014, taken using a Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor fitted with a Baader Neutral Density (ND) 5.0 solar filter.

Sunspot AR 2192_Oct26_2014_full_disc

Image of the active region (AR) 2192 sunspot group on October 26, 2014. This image was taken using a Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor fitted with a Baader Neutral Density (ND) 5.0 solar filter, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 1/4000 sec exp, IS0 200. Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

Sunspot AR 2192_Oct26_2014

Image of the active region (AR) 2192 sunspot group on October 26, 2014. This image was taken using a Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor fitted with a Baader Neutral Density (ND) 5.0 solar filter, Kenko NES mount, Philips SPC900NC/00 web camera, UV-IR filter. Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

For more images of sunspots, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Jupiter_jupiter_february2_2014

Image captured through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a 6 mm eyepiece, a UV-IR filter, and a Philips SPC900NC/00 web camera. Jupiter’s cloud bands and the Great Red Spot are visible in this photo. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of Jupiter, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus_20October2013_55percent_waning_gibbous

Image of Venus taken on October 20, 2013 through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a 5 mm eyepiece, a UV-IR filter, and a Philips SPC900NC/00 web camera. Venus is currently at its waning gibbous phase (55% illumination). Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of Venus, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Jupiter_July7,2012

An animation of Jupiter demonstrating the planet’s rotation in a span of just 30 minutes, created from a total of 17,000 frames (equivalent to 40 gigabytes of image data), processed using IRIS. Jupiter completes 1 full rotation on its axis every 10 hours. Image captured through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a 25 mm eyepiece, and a Philips SPC900NC/00 web camera. For more images of planets, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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