I started setting up my equipment at around 1 am at the PAGASA Astronomical Observatory in preparation for the relatively rare lunar occultation involving Jupiter and 4 of its brightest satellites, an event which also coincided with the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower.  Fellow astronomy enthusiasts from the UP Astronomical Society and also some walk-in guests were there to observe.

Jupiter a few minutes before it disappears behind the moon on August 12, 2012 as observed from Quezon City, Philippines. This image is a post-processed screenshot taken from the video timer setup.

The following video was taken with my timing setup: Canon 450D attached to a Sky-Watcher 100 ED refractor, with the camera’s video output fed onto a video time inserter (IOTA-VTI) and then recorded using a laptop. Unfortunately, the clouds rolled in during ingress, thus, I was not able to completely document that part. This video however, shows Jupiter a few minutes before the predicted time that it would ‘disappear’ or ‘hide’ behind the moon.

The sky cleared up a bit during egress, and thus I was able to take a photo and a video of Jupiter as it emerges from behind the moon.

Jupiter emerging from behind the moon on August 12, 2012 as observed from Quezon City, Philippines. This image is a post-processed screenshot taken from the video timer setup.

I also took some long-exposure images to reveal Jupiter’s moons.

Jupiter and its moons emerging from behind the moon at around 3:30 am on August 12, 2012, as observed from Quezon City, Philippines.

It was also an opportunity to capture a close-up view of Jupiter, and a beautiful planetary alignment involving Jupiter, the moon, and Venus.

First Jupiter photo this season! Image taken with a Logitech 4000 web camera through eyepiece projection method using a 4-in f/9 refractor and a 25 mm eyepiece. For more photos of Jupiter, click here.

Jupiter-Moon-Venus alignment taken with a DSLR-on-a-tripod using a 50 mm/f1.8 prime lens. For more photos of planetary grouping, click here.

Not much of a show for this year’s Perseids. Only 7 meteors per hour was the local predicted rate. I was only able to count two, but my fellow enthusiasts counted more than a dozen. Here’s a group picture which concluded our observation:

With members of the UP Astronomical Society during the Perseid meteor shower observation and the lunar occultation of Jupiter

Clear skies everyone!

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Advertisements