Due to the moon’s close proximity to us, a wealth of detail can be seen even with a small telescope, or just with a pair of binoculars. The features visible in the following photos typically represent the details that can be seen even with small-aperture telescopes.

Waxing_Gibbous_Moon_January 28, 2016

Waxing Gibbous Moon (January 28, 2016). Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 1100D DSLR, 1/3200 sec exp, ISO 800. Photo Credit: Anthony Guiller Urbano

gallery_supermoon_may_6_2012

Photo of the Moon, taken on May 6, 2012 with a 4-in f/9 refractor and a Canon 450D DSLR, ISO 400, 1/400 sec exposure. Photo Credit: Anthony Guiller Urbano

gallery_quartermoon_jan1,2012.jpg

First Quarter Moon taken on January 1, 2012, using a 4 inch 4/9 refractor, a Canon 45D DSLR, 1/500 sec exposure, ISO 1600. Photo Credit: Anthony Guiller Urbano

gallery_waningcrescent_apr15,2012

Waning Crescent Moon rising a few hours before sunrise. Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR,1/800 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 15, 2012. Photo Credit: Anthony Guiller Urbano

gallery_surprisemoon

While the moon is naturally visible at daytime for approximately a week or so in each lunar cycle, most of us are not accustomed to seeing the moon during the day.  Image taken with a mobile phone camera on April 4, 2012 at around 3 pm looking east, in Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Guiller Urbano

Related link: My first moon photo (2005)

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Advertisements