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Tag Archive: Eclipse Philippines


Lunar Eclipse on July 28, 2018

In the Philippines, eclipse maximum will occur at 4:21 am on July 28, 2018

The moon will turn red on July 28, 2018, visible from 3:30 am to 5:13 am in the Philippines. The best time to view the moon will be at 4:21 am when the moon is at its deepest red hue. No special equipment is required to view the eclipse, although binoculars used for birding and other outdoor activities will greatly improve the viewing experience.

The eclipse will be visible in most parts of Africa (9:30 pm to 11:13 pm on July 27) and Asia (midnight of July 27 to early morning of July 28). Only the end part of the eclipse will be visible in Southern America from 5 pm to 8 pm on July 27 (one side of the moon will turn dark, but will not turn red).

To find out the exact time of the eclipse in your location, checkout this interactive eclipse map here.

To receive updates on upcoming astronomical events, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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anthony_urbano_april4_2015_ph

Lunar eclipse as observed from Camarines Norte, Philippines on April 4, 2015. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For images of previous lunar eclipses, click here.

Lunar eclipse as observed from Camarines Norte, Philippines on April 4, 2015. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. The deep red hue of the moon is caused by sunlight refracted by the Earth’s atmosphere where most of the blue light has already been scattered, leaving only the red light to fall on to the moon’s surface.

Related links:
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on TV 5 (October 8, 2014)
Solar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 24, 2013)
Lunar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 23, 2013)
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on ABS-CBN (June 16, 2011)

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. One such event will occur on April 4, 2015, visible from anywhere in the Philippines, from around 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm (Philippine Time).

How to Observe and What to Expect

In the Philippines, a total lunar eclipse will be observed–the moon darkens and turns red-orange for a few minutes as it briefly passes completely through the Earth’s shadow. Observing the eclipse requires no special equipment. The event may be observed from anywhere in the country provided that there is a clear view of the eastern horizon, and no clouds block the view of the moon. On April 4, 2015, simply face east from 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm and look for the rising moon. The best time to observe will be at around 8 pm, at eclipse maximum.

Lunar Eclipse April 4, 2015

View of the eastern horizon at eclipse maximum (8 pm Philippine Time or 12:00 Universal Time) on April 4, 2015. Simulated image generated using Stellarium. (Click to enlarge.)

The eclipse will also be visible in most parts of Asia, North and South America, and Australia. For more information, click here.

Join Upcoming Observations

Join me and fellow astronomy enthusiasts in observing various astronomical events! It is free and is open to everyone! Take a look at our previous observations.

Astronomical observations are geared towards sharing astronomy with the general public. To keep you posted on upcoming events, click here .

For previous lunar eclipse observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

lunar_eclipse_8_october_2014_anthony_urbano

Total Lunar Eclipse as observed from Quezon City, Philippines on October 8, 2014. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. The deep red hue of the moon is caused by sunlight refracted by the Earth’s atmosphere where most of the blue light has already been scattered, leaving only the red light to fall on to the moon’s surface. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images lunar eclipse images, click here.

Related links:
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on TV 5 (October 8, 2014)
Solar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 24, 2013)
Lunar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 23, 2013)
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on ABS-CBN (June 16, 2011)

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Go_Teacher_Go_Lunar_Eclipse_October_2014

Upcoming October 8, 2014 Total Lunar Eclipse discussed in Go Teacher Go

With a total eclipse of the moon set to occur on October 8, Go Teacher Go episode aired on October 2, 2014 covered the topic Lunar Eclipse. In the K to 12 Science curriculum, both solar and lunar eclipses are discussed as part of the Grade 7 Earth and Space Science topics. Students at this level learn about the reasons for the occurrence of eclipses and investigate local beliefs and practices associated with them. This week’s event presents a wonderful opportunity for both teachers and students to observe an actual lunar eclipse.

Go Teacher Go is a teacher-on-the-air program of the UP NISMED intended for math and science teachers, aired through the official radio station of the University of the Philippines, DZUP 1602 kHz in the AM band. Ms. Malu Agad of the UP NISMED Audiovisual Group hosted the episode.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, during instances when the Sun, the Earth, and the moon are in alignment. One such event will occur on October 8, 2014, visible from anywhere in the Philippines, from 6 to 8 pm (Philippine Time).

How to Observe and What to Expect

In the Philippines, a total lunar eclipse will be observed–the moon darkens and turns deep red-orange as it passes completely through the Earth’s shadow. Observing the eclipse requires no special equipment. The event may be observed from anywhere in the country provided that there is a clear view of the eastern horizon, and no clouds block the view of the moon. On October 8, 2014, simply face east from 6 to 8 pm and look for the rising moon. The best time to observe will be at around 6:55 pm, at eclipse maximum .

Lunar_Eclispe_Oct_8_2014

View of the eastern horizon at eclipse maximum (6:55 pm Philippine Time or 10:55 Universal Time) on October 8, 2014. Simulated image generated using Stellarium. (Click to enlarge.)

The eclipse will also be visible in most parts of Asia, and North and South America.

Related links:
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on TV 5 (October 8, 2014)
Solar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 24, 2013)
Lunar Eclipse Photo featured on PTV 4 (January 23, 2013)
Solar Eclipse Observation featured on GMA 7 (May 21, 2012)
Lunar Eclipse Observation featured on ABS-CBN (June 16, 2011)

To subscribe to this site and learn about upcoming astronomical events, click here. For previous lunar eclipse observations, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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