M92 Globular Cluster in Hercules

M92 globular cluster in Hercules imaged using a Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 90 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 9, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

Advertisements

Supernova SN 2012aw April 8, 2012

Image of the supernova SN 2012aw (currently at magnitude 13.3) discovered by an Italian astronomer Paolo Fagotti last March 17, 2012 in M95 galaxy in the constellation Leo. The spiral arms of the galaxy to which the supernova belongs to is barely visible in this photo. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 5 x 90 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 8, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of supernova, click here.

M57 Ring Nebula April 5, 2012

M57, the Ring Nebula, is a planetary nebula in the constellation Lyra. It is a cloud of cold gas expanding away from a small hot central star that provides energy for the gas cloud to glow. The nebula is relatively easy to find and is visible even with 3-4 inch telescopes. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 10 x 60 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 5, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano. For more images of nebula, click here.

M8 Lagoon Nebula and the Open Cluster NGC 6530 April 6, 2012

M8, the Lagoon Nebula, is a cloud of ionized hydrogen gas some 50 light-years in diameter, located about 5000 light-years away. It is a region in space where new stars form. To the east of the nebula is the open cluster NGC 6530, also visible in this photograph. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 2 x 240 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 6, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

M20 Trifid Nebula and M21 Open Cluster April 6, 2012

M20 is a cloud of ionized hydrogen gas some 25 light-years in diameter. Dark lanes visible in 3-4 inch telescopes may be seen extending from its center towards the west, northeast, and southeast, effectively dividing the nebula into 3 distinct patches, hence the name ‘Trifid’ which means ‘split into three,’ was derived. M21, an open cluster, is also visible in this photo (upper left of the nebula). Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 240 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 6, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

 

M7 (Ptolemy’s Cluster) April 6, 2012

M7, also called the Ptolemy’s Cluster, is an open cluster in Scorpius, with its stars spread in such a large area (1 degree), and thus, best viewed with a pair of binoculars. With a small telescope and on a dark clear night, fainter stars in the cluster may be observed. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 60 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 6, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

M6 (Butterfly Cluster) April 6, 2012

M6 is an open cluster in Scorpius also known as the Butterfly Cluster. To the naked eye, its stars are on the verge of visibility, making an illusion of a ‘flying butterfly’ as the stars in the cluster twinkle. The brightest star in the cluster, BM Scorpii (an orange star), varies brightness from 6th to 8th magnitude in a period of approximately 28 months. Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 60 sec exp, IS0 1600. April 6, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

M4 Globular Cluster April 6, 2012

Just one degree west of the bright star Antares (2 moon diameters), M4 is one of the easy-to-find globular clusters. It is 100 light-years in diameter and only 7000 light-years away (rather close in terms of globular cluster standards). Sky-Watcher 100 ED 4 in f/9 refractor, Kenko NES mount, Canon 450D DSLR, 60 secexp, IS0 1600. April 6, 2012, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano