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Category: Astrophotography


As you move away from a city, the glaring lights that cause light pollution are greatly diminished, allowing one to see fainter stars. In recent years, Antipolo has been of a particular interest to astronomy enthusiasts, perhaps this is due to its relatively dark skies and short travel distance from Manila. A popular destination is Seven Suites Hotel Observatory, which opened in 1998. This hotel allows you to conduct stargazing sessions in the comforts of a hotel. Another popular site is intended for the outdoor type who wants to setup tents in a camp site–the Big Handy’s Grounds.

For about 7 years now, me and my colleagues–a rather tight group (less than ten people) have been taking astronomical photos from a less known but equally capable site in Antipolo. It has become our favorite observing site because it is safe, it has power (for our laptops, telescopes, and cameras), there are facilities that we can use, and of course, we can arrange exclusive access to the place.

Basically, any place in Antipolo, be it a resort, a campsite, or a full-fledged hotel, should offer skies dark enough for visual and astronomical photography work. If you are into astronomy, find a spot there and start observing!

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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If you are into DIY projects, you most probably have come across some projects featured in HACKADAY. One of my DIY projects, the Ultra-Portable Tracker Setup was featured yesterday, October 16, 2016.

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DIY Tracker featured in HACKADAY

Special thanks to James Hobson for featuring my project!

For other DIY projects, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Photo of Saturn taken on May 8, 2016 through eyepiece projection with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Logitech Pro 4000 web camera. The gap between the rings of Saturn (called the Cassini Division), is visible in this photo.

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Photo of Saturn taken on May 8, 2016. Image captured through eyepiece projection method with a 4-in f/9 refractor, UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and a Logitech Pro 4000 web camera. Processed using AutoStakkert and Registax. For more images of planets, click here. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Photo of Mars taken on May 5, 2016 through eyepiece projection with a 4-in f/9 refractor, a UV-IR filter, a 5 mm eyepiece, and an SPC900NC/00 web camera. The polar ice cap, the dark and the bright areas, and the clouds on Mars are visible in the photo.

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The polar ice cap, the light and dark areas, and the clouds on Mars are visible in this photo. For more images of planets, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Images of the active region (AR) 2529 sunspot group on April 16, 2016, taken using a Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor fitted with a Baader Neutral Density (ND) 5.0 solar filter.

AR2529_Sunspot_April16_2016

Image of the active region (AR) 2529 sunspot group on April 16, 2016. This image was taken using a Sky-Watcher 4-in f/9 refractor fitted with a Baader Neutral Density (ND) 5.0 solar filter, Canon 1100D DSLR, 1/4000 sec exp, IS0 100. Quezon City, Philippines. Photo Credit: Anthony Urbano

For more images of sunspots, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

The Celestron Travel Scope 70 is a small telescope designed for viewing distant land-based targets (such as birds and trees) and for casual astronomical observations. While many enthusiasts would purchase this telescope perhaps as a grab-and-go telescope, my intention for acquiring one is different since I intend to use it as a guide scope for my autoguider setup (if you want to know more about it, click here).

I have been using this telescope for several months now, and I believe I now have a firm grasp of what it can and cannot do, and its advantages and disadvantages. In this article, I intend to share some of my insights about the Celestron Travel Scope 70, particularly in the context of visual observation and astrophotography.

CelestronTravelScope70

Celestron Travel Scope 70 used during a public observation (left). Actual moon image taken with a Celestron Travel Scope 70 (right).

To learn more about the Celestron Travel Scope 70 and how it can be used to photograph the Sun, the Moon, and the moons of Jupiter, click here.

If you would like to know more about amateur astronomy and astrophotography, kindly follow the link: Getting Started.

For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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