Scheduled SSTV Transmissions (February 2019)

The International Space Station (ISS) is scheduled to transmit Slow Scan Television (SSTV) images this weekend, as reported in the ARISS-SSTV webpage.

Start: February 15, 8:45 UTC (February 15, 4:45 pm, Philippine Standard Time)
End: February 17, 17:25 UTC (February 18, 1:25 am, Philippine Standard Time)

All ISS passes within this period present opportunities to receive the SSTV transmissions. You can use an app called ISS Detector (for smart phones) or visit the website Heavens-Above to view upcoming passes (do not forget to set the apps to show all passes, and not just the visible ones).

To receive and decode the transmissions, you need a radio receiver capable of tuning to 145.800 MHz and a decoder app such as Robot 36.

ISS pass details (Philippine Standard Time) generated using Heavens Above

Related link: Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the International Space Station

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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SSTV image from the ISS received on February 9, 2019

SSTV image from the International Space Station (145.8 MHz), received on February 9, 2019 from Bacoor Cavite, Philippines, using an FT60 portable two-way radio with Robot 36 decoder app

 

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.

To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Receiving SSTV Transmissions from the ISS

Here’s a short demo on how I used a two-way radio and a smart phone to receive Slow Scan Tele-Vision (SSTV) images from the International Space Station (SSTV) as it orbits the Earth at a height of about 400 km. The transmission was received on February 9, at around 8 am local time, from Bacoor City, Cavite.

Equipment: Yaesu FT60
Decoder app: Robot 36
ISS locator app: ISS Detector
Frequency: 145.8 MHz

To learn more about receiving SSTV images from the ISS, click here.

Related link: Receiving Transmissions from Space

To subscribe to this site, click here.
© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Stargazing at UP NISMED Observatory

 

A short stargazing session on February 8, 2019, with members of UP Astronomical Society

To view our previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

DZUP Interview for NAW 2019

Every third week of February, Philippines celebrate the National Astronomy Week (NAW). Yesterday, I was invited to a radio interview with fellow amateur astronomers from UP Astronomical Society to discuss about the NAW 2019, and explain how to get started with amateur astronomy.

From left: Anthony Karl Alipit, Kenneth Bailador, Anthony Urbano

Related link: Science Education

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Moon, Venus, and Jupiter (January 2019)

As described in a previous post, the Moon, along with the two planets Jupiter and Venus, form a celestial triangle, visible anywhere in the Philippines and in most parts of the world. If you missed this event earlier today, you may still catch it tomorrow (by tomorrow, the moon has moved a bit already, thus, you will see a different configuration).

moon-venus-jupiter_31_january_2019
From top to bottom: Moon, Jupiter, and Venus (January 31, 2019, Bacoor, Cavite)

No special equipment needed to view a celestial grouping of the moon and planets. To view more photos of celestial pairings and groupings, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus and Jupiter in the Early Morning Sky

Venus and Jupiter pair continues to dazzle early risers as the planets form an impressive sight this month of January until early February. This event is visible all throughout the Philippines and in most parts of the world. For information on how to spot this celestial event, click here.

Taken with a DSLR camera earlier today, January 19, 2019, 5 am, from Bacoor, Cavite, Philippines

To keep posted with astronomical events visible in the Philippines, visit my blog site (run by a local amateur astronomer and astrophotographer) www.nightskyinfocus.com.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Southern Cross at Dawn

A constellation with a cross pattern is now visible in the early morning sky. This is the constellation Crux, or the “Southern Cross”. It has four prominent stars and can be seen very easily with the naked eye. The cross may tilt differently (to the left or to the right) depending on the time of observation. Crux is best viewed this month of January until May, visible from the Philippines and most parts of the world.

southern cross january 2019
Taken yesterday, January 16, 2019, from Bacoor City, Cavite, using a DSLR camera on a tripod. For more photos of constellations taken in the Philippines, click here.

To find the constellation, just face the southern horizon a few hours before sunrise.

For more constellation photos taken in the Philippines, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

 

Venus-Jupiter Conjunction (January 2019)

venus - jupiter pair january 19, 2019
Venus-Jupiter pair (conjuction) in the morning sky, visible from the Philippines and in most parts of the world (image taken on January 16, 2019, from Bacoor, Cavite). For more photos of celestial groupings, click here.

The Venus-Jupiter pair (or what astronomers refer to as conjunction) can now be seen in the early morning sky. The two planets, in reality, are separated by vast distances. It just so happened that currently, the two planets are found in the same general direction, creating the illusion that they are close to each other. The separation will be smallest on January 23, 2019 (best viewed from 4 am to 6 am). Another notable event occurs on January 31, when the moon joins the two planets to form a celestial triangle.

For instructions on how to observe this event, click here. For more photos of celestial groupings, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)