Stargazing at UP NISMED Observatory

 

A short stargazing session on February 8, 2019, with members of UP Astronomical Society

To view our previous observations, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
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© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

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DZUP Interview for NAW 2019

Every third week of February, Philippines celebrate the National Astronomy Week (NAW). Yesterday, I was invited to a radio interview with fellow amateur astronomers from UP Astronomical Society to discuss about the NAW 2019, and explain how to get started with amateur astronomy.

From left: Anthony Karl Alipit, Kenneth Bailador, Anthony Urbano

Related link: Science Education

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Moon, Venus, and Jupiter (January 2019)

As described in a previous post, the Moon, along with the two planets Jupiter and Venus, form a celestial triangle, visible anywhere in the Philippines and in most parts of the world. If you missed this event earlier today, you may still catch it tomorrow (by tomorrow, the moon has moved a bit already, thus, you will see a different configuration).

moon-venus-jupiter_31_january_2019
From top to bottom: Moon, Jupiter, and Venus (January 31, 2019, Bacoor, Cavite)

No special equipment needed to view a celestial grouping of the moon and planets. To view more photos of celestial pairings and groupings, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus and Jupiter in the Early Morning Sky

Venus and Jupiter pair continues to dazzle early risers as the planets form an impressive sight this month of January until early February. This event is visible all throughout the Philippines and in most parts of the world. For information on how to spot this celestial event, click here.

Taken with a DSLR camera earlier today, January 19, 2019, 5 am, from Bacoor, Cavite, Philippines

To keep posted with astronomical events visible in the Philippines, visit my blog site (run by a local amateur astronomer and astrophotographer) www.nightskyinfocus.com.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Southern Cross at Dawn

A constellation with a cross pattern is now visible in the early morning sky. This is the constellation Crux, or the “Southern Cross”. It has four prominent stars and can be seen very easily with the naked eye. The cross may tilt differently (to the left or to the right) depending on the time of observation. Crux is best viewed this month of January until May, visible from the Philippines and most parts of the world.

southern cross january 2019
Taken yesterday, January 16, 2019, from Bacoor City, Cavite, using a DSLR camera on a tripod. For more photos of constellations taken in the Philippines, click here.

To find the constellation, just face the southern horizon a few hours before sunrise.

For more constellation photos taken in the Philippines, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

 

Venus-Jupiter Conjunction (January 2019)

venus - jupiter pair january 19, 2019
Venus-Jupiter pair (conjuction) in the morning sky, visible from the Philippines and in most parts of the world (image taken on January 16, 2019, from Bacoor, Cavite). For more photos of celestial groupings, click here.

The Venus-Jupiter pair (or what astronomers refer to as conjunction) can now be seen in the early morning sky. The two planets, in reality, are separated by vast distances. It just so happened that currently, the two planets are found in the same general direction, creating the illusion that they are close to each other. The separation will be smallest on January 23, 2019 (best viewed from 4 am to 6 am). Another notable event occurs on January 31, when the moon joins the two planets to form a celestial triangle.

For instructions on how to observe this event, click here. For more photos of celestial groupings, click here.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

 

 

 

Moon joins Venus and Jupiter on Jan 31, 2019

In a previous post, I’ve described how to observe the pairing of Venus and Jupiter, best viewed from January 16 to 27, 2019. On January 31, 5:30 am, the two planets will be joined by the moon to form a celestial triangle. This is one of the most fascinating sights in amateur astronomy, do not miss it! On February 1 (a day after), the moon will still be in the general direction of the two planets, but will not form an impressive triangle as in January 31.

moon-venus-jupiter conjunction january 31 2019
Face east at 5:30 am on January 31, 2019

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

MSA’s Astronomy Outreach Events 2019

The first few months of the year are known to Manila-based astronomers as the astronomy season, because this is the time of the year Manila and nearby provinces experience clear skies (the rest of the year are rainy months not suitable for astronomical observations). My colleagues at Manila Street Astronomers (MSA) are now conducting FREE telescope viewing events not only in Manila, but in other provinces as well. These outreach astronomy events are open to everyone (bring your kids, and the whole family)!

Below is a list of MSA’s astronomy outreach events for January (bookmark this page as I will update this post as soon as schedule for other months become available).

msa january 2019
MSA’s Astronomy Outreach Events for January

Arrive early, and bring your cameras. If the moon is visible, volunteer astronomers will assist you in getting a photo of the moon!

Manila Street Astronomers is a non-profit outreach astronomy group. For most recent events announcements, please head directly to their website.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)

Venus and Jupiter Pair Up in the Sky

This is an ongoing sky event. Watch a video of the event taken on January 16, 5:30 am, in Bacoor, Cavite.

Venus and Jupiter will appear close together in the sky, from January 16 to 27, 2019, visible in the Philippines and most parts of the world. These two planets can be seen with the naked eye, no telescopes needed. A mobile phone camera should be adequate enough to capture this event (if you use a DSLR, then perhaps you can capture a photo of you with the planets in the background).

Information on how to spot the planets are provided below:

venus - jupiter conjunction january 2019
Visible anywhere in the Philippines (and most parts of the world), no telescopes needed, just use your eyes!

How to spot the pairing of Jupiter and Venus

1. Wake up early. The planet pair is best viewed at around 5:30 am (Philippine Standard Time), from January 16 to 27, 2019.
2. Face the eastern horizon. Pick a good spot, free of any obstruction. If there is a structure such as house or building, you might not be able to see the pairing.
3. If you plan to observe the event every day, make sure to take a photo (or at least try to draw their position). Include the bright stars in your sketch. You should notice that every day, the position of the two changes! That is exactly how early astronomers were able to figure out that they are planets, and not stars (they do seem to wander, that’s why they are called wanderer—or planets! Google it up!)

Let’s hope for clear skies! Don’t forget to share this post! Wake up everyone, this is a rare astronomical event!!

To keep posted with astronomical events visible in the Philippines, visit my blog site (run by a local amateur astronomer and astrophotographer) www.nightskyinfocus.com.

For featured photos, click here.
For tutorials on how to get started with astrophotography, click here.
For DIY astronomy projects useful for astrophotography, click here.
To subscribe to this site, click here.

© Anthony Urbano (Manila, Philippines)